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Dr. Kiana Aran and Dr. Paul Grint appointed to CRISPR QC Board of Directors

Updated: Jan 7

Technology Driven Insights to Improve CRISPR Edit Outcomes


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June 09, 2022 01:04 PM Eastern Daylight Time


SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--On June 09, 2022, CRISPR QC has announced that Paul Grint and Dr. Kiana Aran have been appointed to the board of directors. "CRISPR QC’s technology is empowering scientists to put the puzzle pieces together of CRISPR editing in a way that was not before possible. Researchers and therapeutics companies can now better design CRISPR components to fit different applications. This insight is driving better understanding of CRISPR activity that will lead to an acceleration of game-changing gene therapies, developments in agriculture, and more," says Dr. Kiana Aran.

Dr. Kiana Aran is a pioneer of combining CRISPR with modern electronics. In addition to inventing the CRISPR-Chip™, she is an Associate Professor of Medical Diagnostics and Therapeutics at Keck Graduate Institute, a member of the Claremont Colleges, and a visiting Assistant Professor at the University of California Berkeley. Dr. Aran also serves as a Consultant of Drug Delivery and Medical Diagnostics for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Her efforts have been recognized within the scientific community by the Clinical OMICs 10 under 40 Award, Athena Pinnacle Award in Life Sciences, and Nature Research Awards for Inspiring Women in Science: Scientific Achievement Category’s Overall Winner 2021. Dr. Aran is also the recipient of numerous grants to develop the next generation of electronic biosensors, including the NSF CAREER Award and multiple NIH RO1 and DARPA grants.

“CRISPR has the potential to finally cure genetic diseases where we are currently only able to treat the symptoms. With the insight CRISPR QC provides, therapeutics companies will be better able to develop efficacious treatments by truly understanding the activity of CRISPR and will allow regulators to ensure that these treatments are safe for the patients receiving them by being able to directly measure and report the mechanics at work," says Paul Grint.

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